Q5D Adding Electrical Function

by Stephen Bennington, Q5D Technology Limited at Online 3D Printing Electronics Conference. REGISTER HERE to attend

Q5D’s technology is the fusion of two technologies: laser sintered printed, which makes it possible to print with copper or silver ink and then use a laser to cure and sinter the ink; and innovative 5-axis additive manufacturing which is able to accurately deposit inks or dielectrics.

This makes it possible to print conductive tracks on large curved surfaces or create complex structures with compact 3D circuitry for surface mounted components.

Additionally, the tools can embed cable to automate the manufacture of structures for power and data or add fibre optics and even stiffening fibres such as Kevlar or carbon.

program: https://www.3dprintingelectronicsconference.com/speakers/

Interview

What drives you?

An interest in the technology and its possibilities, and the desire to create and motivate a high functioning team that can drive the growth in the business.

Why should the delegate attend your presentation?

My talk will of course describe Q5D’s technology, but it will also describe some of the exciting work we are doing with Airbus, Safran and small space companies like Oxford Space Systems.

What emerging technologies/trends do you see as having the greatest potential in the short and long run?

The laser sintered printed electronics is a game changer

What kind of impact do you expect them to have?

Laser sintering create very-high performance tracks with conductivities that are 30-50% of the solid metal, without the need to oven cure the conductive inks, but it also makes it possible to use copper rather than silver to dramatically reduce costs.

What are the barriers that might stand in the way?

The key barriers for Q5D technology is the innate conservatism in markets which are quite rightly highly safety conscious and of course being able to confirm to or where necessary change complex regulation.

Stephen Bennington is the CEO of Q5D.

After my PhD in Physics, I worked for over 20 years as a Scientist, designing and building national scale scientific infrastructure projects running the teams to exploit these facilities as a service for academia and industry.

In 2006 I became a visiting professor UCL and set up a spin-out, Cella Energy that developed hydrogen-based power systems.

After leaving Cella in 2016 I co-founded Krino Partners to work with spinouts to develop business plans and raise funds.

In 2019 we set up Q5D a robotics company that adds electrical functionality to components by embedding wiring or using laser sintered printed electronics.

Q5D Technology Limited is a robotics company that adds electrical functionality to components by embedding wiring or using laser sintered printed electronics, combined with highly flexible 5-axis additive manufacture to automate the manufacture of both power and data parts of an electrical subsystem.

This makes it possible both to add high quality conductive tracks on large curved surfaces or create complex structures with compact three-dimensional conductive circuitry for surface mounted components.

The 3D Printing Electronics Conference is a platform and information interface enabling an exchange of informations on market requirements, research interests and current results, skills and resources as well as facilitating the building of future partnerships. Academics, engineers, designers, and managers are invited to lecture on their state-of-the-art developments and future prospects or display their products and offers as exhibitor. The conference focuses on various aspects involving (3D) printed electronics such as: combining functional elements such as electronics (sensors or switches) into a (3D) printed product hybrid / printed circuit boards, processes that integrate electronics onto or within 3D printed parts, 3D Printed Optics / Photonics, Challenges for manufacturers / engineers / researchers and Future prospects.