The Electro-mechanical analysis of conductive tracks in Lightweight Embedded Electronics

The increasing demand for flexible, stretchable and embedded electronic technologies has resulted in the deployment of Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques for the production of electronic components and interconnecting conducting tracks via the accurate and selective deposition of conductive inks. The electromechanical performance of the conductive track material is captured by the response of the effective resistivity under increasing mechanical strains and of particular importance for the functionality of the printed products.


A multi-physics model is presented that allows for the analysis of the effects of strains imposed on the conductive track material and the prediction of the electromechanical performance of given ink compositions.

A Presentation by Britt Cordewener , Eindhoven University of Technology.

Interview

Question 1: What drives you?
The Electro-mechanical analysis of conductive tracks in Lightweight Embedded Electronics

Question 2: Why should the delegate attend your presentation?
The increasing demand for flexible, stretchable and embedded electronic technologies has resulted in the deployment of AM techniques for the production of electronic components and interconnecting conducting tracks via the accurate and selective deposition of conductive inks. The electromechanical performance of the conductive track material is captured by the response of the effective resistivity under increasing mechanical strains and of particular importance for the functionality of the printed products.
A multi-physics model is presented that allows for the analysis of the effects of strains imposed on the conductive track material and the prediction of the electromechanical performance of given ink compositions.

Question 3: What emerging technologies/trends do you see as having the greatest potential in the short and long run?
Already on short term, AM/3D printing technologies have great potential for the application in a broad variety of electronic components, structures and interconnecting conductive tracks. Numerical modeling may be a key step in enhancing their potential for complex stretchable and flexible applications on the long term by allowing for a speed up in the development of suitable ink compositions and nanomaterials.

Question 4: What kind of impact do you expect them to have?
The AM technologies used for printed electronics allow for the production of devices with embedded and/or flexible electronics while being considered more environment friendly and having the potential to transform the electronics production industry into a more adaptive and smart manufacturing market.

Question 5: What are the barriers that might stand in the way?
Limited micromechanistic understanding of the conductive material of the tracks may lead to longer and more costly development processes. Numerical modeling can speed up this process and give us more insight in the barriers that need to be overcome by developping new techniques or materials.

About Britt Cordewener
Britt Cordewener is a Doctoral Candidate in the Mechanics of Materials (MoM) group of Joris Remmers. Her PhD research is focused on the Additive Manufacturing of lightweight embedded electronics. Combining Additive Manufacturing (AM) with Direct Write (DW) technologies such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) allows for the production of objects with embedded electronics and conductive tracks. Britt is researching the thermo-mechanical properties of the printed, conductive tracks and the interfaces between the printed tracks, the substrate and the electronic components to achieve optimal conductivity, printability and performance of the embedded electronics.

About Eindhoven University of Technology. Group Remmers
Our research group studies the mechanical properties of complex, engineered materials such as fibre reinforced composites and 3D printed materials for lightweight automotive and aerospace applications. In addition, we investigate the mechanical behaviour and fluid flow in fractured porous materials. In all these cases, we develop novel numerical techniques using our own in-house developed Finite Element codes.

Britt Cordewener is speaker at the 2021 edition of the 3D Printing Electronics Conference.