Roughness reduction and functional coating deposition on additive manufactured substrates with ultrasonic spray coating

wim deferme

by Wim Deferme, Hasselt University, Institute for Materials Research (IMO-IMOMEC)

Roughness of as-printed 3D parts is limiting the real breakthrough of Additive Manufacturing. Post processing technologies consist out of subtractive techniques such as grinding or sanding, or out of additive techniques such as coating.

In this presentation Ultrasonic Spray Coating as an additive post processing technologie is described to first of all reduce the roughness of Selective Laser Sintered substrates down to less than 2 micrometer and further, functional formulations consisting out of a polymer and nanoparticles is prepared to not only reduce the roughness but also add functionalities to the surface of the 3D substrate such as scratch resistance or superhydrophobicity.

Continue reading “Roughness reduction and functional coating deposition on additive manufactured substrates with ultrasonic spray coating”

Highly conductive 3D printable gallium alloy shows promise for flexible electronics

3D printable gallium alloy

Researchers in Oregon State University’s College of Engineering have taken a key step toward the rapid manufacture of flexible computer screens and other stretchable electronic devices, including soft robots.

The advance by a team within the college’s Collaborative Robotics and Intelligent Systems Institute paves the way toward the 3D printing of tall, complicated structures with a highly conductive gallium alloy.

Researchers put nickel nanoparticles into the liquid metal, galinstan, to thicken it into a paste with a consistency suitable for additive manufacturing.

“The runny alloy was impossible to layer into tall structures,” said Yiğit Mengüç, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and co-corresponding author on the study. “With the paste-like texture, it can be layered while maintaining its capacity to flow, and to stretch inside of rubber tubes. We demonstrated the potential of our discovery by 3D printing a very stretchy two-layered circuit whose layers weave in and out of each other without touching.”

Findings were recently published in Advanced Materials Technologies. Continue reading “Highly conductive 3D printable gallium alloy shows promise for flexible electronics”

Silver or copper? Simon Fried, Nano Dimension, speaks about inkjet printing

Simon Fried

Recently I caught up with Simon Fried, chief business officer and one of the founders of Nano Dimension, an Israeli start up that is targeting the market for printed circuit boards or PCBs.

The end goal for many people in additive manufacturing is not so much the ability to print individual components but rather to print a sub assembly or a whole object in a single process. Ultimately this also means being able to print the electronic elements of those objects, which explains why there is so much interest in Nano Dimensions. Continue reading “Silver or copper? Simon Fried, Nano Dimension, speaks about inkjet printing”

Optics Industry: Digitizing Old Analogue Manufacturing Techniques

The optics industry is an old analogue industry. For a few thousand years people have been making optics in the same way, using polishing and grinding processes. This is time-consuming, expensive and difficult to scale up. In the 1950’s, injection moulding arrived and standard lenses could be made in high volumes. Now, Luxexcel’s new additive manufacturing techniques are allowing new possibilities in optics and photonics. Continue reading “Optics Industry: Digitizing Old Analogue Manufacturing Techniques”